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Your searched on: Heart Attacks

Thrombolytics for Heart Attack and Stroke
Thrombolytics are medicines that rapidly dissolve a blood clot. They are used when a blood clot causes an emergency, such as a heart attack or stroke. These clot-busting medicines help blood to flow normally again. Thrombolytics are used as soon as possible after a heart attack or stroke. These medicines are used in the...

Heart Attack and Unstable Angina
Covers causes of heart attack (myocardial infarction) and unstable angina. Discusses symptoms like chest pain or pressure. Explains MI and angina differences. Offers prevention tips. Covers diagnostic tests and treatment with medicines and surgery.

Heart Attack and Stroke Risk Screening
Screening for heart attack and stroke risk is a way for your doctor to check your chance of having a problem called atherosclerosis. This problem is also called hardening of the arteries. It is the starting point for most heart and blood flow problems, such as coronary artery disease, heart attack, stroke, and...

Aspirin to Prevent Heart Attack and Stroke
Discusses taking aspirin to prevent a first and second heart attack for people who have coronary artery disease. Covers aspirin therapy to help lower risk of a stroke. Discusses if aspirin therapy is for you. Looks at things to avoid while taking aspirin.

Heart Attack: How to Prevent Another One
After you've had a heart attack, you may be worried that you could have another one. That's easy to understand. But the good news is that there are things you can do to reduce your risk of having another heart attack. Take your medicine. Medicines can help prevent another heart attack. Some of the medicines your doctor...

Resuming Sexual Activity After a Heart Attack
When can I have sex again? Sex is part of a healthy life and part of your quality of life. It is safe for most people after they have had a heart attack. After a heart attack, you can resume sexual activity when you are healthy and feel ready for it. You could be ready if you can do mild or moderate activity, like brisk...

Diabetes: Lower Your Risk for Heart Attack and Stroke
For some people, diabetes can cause problems that increase the risk of a heart attack or stroke. Many things can lead to a heart attack or stroke. These include high blood sugar, insulin resistance, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure. Lifestyle and genetics may also play a part. But here's the good news: The...

Alan's Story: Coping With Change After a Heart Attack
Alan is something of a miracle man. At the age of 32, he had a massive heart attack. But more than 40 years, 4 bypass surgeries, 30 angioplasties, and a combined pacemaker/defibrillator later, he's still thriving. He learned how to cope with heart disease the hard way. Alan had always been healthy and athletic. Except...

Physical Activity Helps Prevent a Heart Attack and Stroke
Physical activity is one of the best things you can do to help prevent a heart attack or stroke. Being active is one part of a heart-healthy lifestyle. Eating healthy foods, not smoking, and staying at a healthy weight are other ways you can be heart-healthy and help prevent a heart attack or a stroke. If you are not...

Statins: Should I Take Them to Prevent a Heart Attack or Stroke?
Guides people not already diagnosed with coronary artery disease through decision to take statin medicine to lower risk of heart attack or stroke. Covers cholesterol and other risk factors. Includes interactive tool to help you make your decision.

Aspirin: Should I Take Daily Aspirin to Prevent a Heart Attack or Stroke?
Guides people who have not had a heart attack or a stroke through decision to take daily aspirin. Discusses benefits and risks. Looks at who can take daily aspirin. Includes interactive tool to help you decide.

Coronary Angioplasty
Covers a procedure, also called percutaneous coronary intervention, to widen narrow coronary arteries for stable angina and heart attack. Includes a slideshow of angioplasty. Describes use of stent and balloon to open artery. Explains why it's done and when it's not done. Includes how well it works, risks, and recovery...

Chest Problems
Briefly discusses possible causes of chest pain, which include angina, heart attack, pneumothorax, and chest wall pain. Covers heart attack symptoms. Offers interactive tool to help decide when to seek care. Also offers home treatment tips.

High Cholesterol
Covers the kinds of cholesterol. Explains that cholesterol is one of many risk factors for heart attack and stroke. Covers treatment to lower risk of heart attack and stroke, which includes healthy habits and statins.

Exercise Electrocardiogram (EKG)
Covers exercise stress test, also called treadmill test or exercise EKG. Explains why it's done, such as finding cause of angina symptoms and checking exercise tolerance after heart attack. Includes how it's done and how it feels. Includes risks.

Cardiac Rehabilitation
Discusses cardiac rehabilitation (rehab), which helps you feel better and reduce risk of future heart problems with exercise and lifestyle changes. Looks at rehab for people who have heart conditions such as heart attack, heart surgery, or heart failure.

Coronary Artery Disease
Includes causes and symptoms of heart disease. Looks at cholesterol, hypertension, and risk of heart attack. Covers diet, physical activity, and treatment with medicines, angioplasty, and bypass surgery. Includes how to help prevent heart disease.

Acute Coronary Syndrome
Covers angina and symptoms that happen when the heart does not get enough blood. Covers unstable angina and heart attack. Discusses treatment with medicines, angioplasty, or bypass surgery. Offers prevention tips.

Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA)
Discusses transient ischemic attack (TIA), sometimes called a mini-stroke. Covers causes, including blood clot as a result of atherosclerosis. Looks at treatment with medicines, surgery, and lifestyle changes. Discusses prevention steps.

Rheumatic Fever and the Heart
Rheumatic fever is a bacterial infection that can cause problems with the heart's aortic and mitral valves. Rheumatic fever is caused by certain strains of streptococcal bacteria. A strep throat infection that isn't properly treated can trigger rheumatic fever. Rheumatic fever can damage heart muscle and heart valves...

High Blood Pressure
Covers causes and symptoms of high blood pressure. Explains systolic and diastolic pressure numbers. Looks at treatment and prevention steps. Includes risks of untreated high blood pressure such as heart attack, stroke, and kidney failure.

Heart Rhythm Problems: Symptoms
Heart rhythm problems, called arrhythmias, can cause a few types of symptoms. Some of these symptoms include: Palpitations. Having palpitations means that you are unusually aware of your heartbeat. Some people describe them as: A "fluttering" in their chest. A "skipped beat." A "pounding sensation." A feeling that the...

Heart-Healthy Eating: Fish
As part of a healthy diet, eat at least two servings of fish each week. Oily fish, which contain omega-3 fatty acids, are best. These fish include salmon, mackerel, lake trout, herring, and sardines. Fish as part of a heart-healthy diet Fish is an important part of a heart-healthy diet. A heart-healthy diet is not just...

Heart Failure: Less Common Symptoms
While there are certain symptoms that people with heart failure experience more commonly, there are many other symptoms that heart failure can cause. These symptoms are typically less common because they often result from more severe heart failure, when the body can no longer compensate properly for the failing heart...

Fainting
What is fainting? Fainting is a sudden, brief loss of consciousness. When people faint, or pass out, they usually fall down. After they are lying down, most people will recover quickly. The term doctors use for fainting is syncope (say "SING-kuh-pee"). Fainting one time is usually nothing to worry about. But it is a...

Cardiac Rehabilitation: Medicine and Exercise
If you are in a cardiac rehab program, you are probably taking medicines for your heart and for other health reasons. Some prescribed medicines can change your heart rate, blood pressure, and overall ability to exercise. It's important for your rehab team to know what medicines you take. Give your rehab team a list of...

Cardiac Rehabilitation: Monitoring Your Body's Response to Exercise
There are several ways to measure your body's responses to exercise and other lifestyle changes. You may want to keep track of the following measurements during your exercise sessions at cardiac rehab and at home. Target heart rate Your target heart rate can guide you to how hard you need to exercise so you can get the...

Carotid Endarterectomy
Discusses carotid endarterectomy surgery to remove plaque buildup in the carotid arteries to prevent stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Includes info on how surgery can help prevent future strokes. Looks at long-term aspirin treatment.

Stroke
Discusses ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, and TIA (transient ischemic attack). Describes stroke symptoms and importance of acting fast if symptoms develop. Covers stroke treatment and prevention.

Smoking and Coronary Artery Disease
Quitting smoking is probably the most important step you can take to decrease your chance of coronary artery disease and a heart attack. Smoking raises your risk of getting coronary artery disease and dying early from it. Carbon monoxide, nicotine, and other substances in tobacco smoke can promote atherosclerosis and...

Cardiac Rehabilitation: Exercise
Exercise is an important part of cardiac rehab. You may do some new exercises and may be asked to monitor yourself when you exercise. Your rehab team will design a specific exercise program for you. It might range from a supervised program monitored by an exercise professional to an independent, self-managed program...

Exercising to Prevent a Stroke
Exercise helps lower high blood pressure, which is an important risk factor for stroke. Exercise can help you control other things that put you at risk, such as obesity, high cholesterol and diabetes. Exercise to lower your risk of stroke It is important to exercise regularly. Do activities that raise your heart rate...

Cardiac Rehabilitation: Weight and Resistance Training
Resistance training may be done with many things, including weights, elastic bands, machines, or your own body weight. Resistance training can help you get the most benefit from your cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) program. Do not start a strength-training program without discussing it with your doctor. Your doctor can...

Cardiac Rehabilitation Team
After you start a cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) program, you will work with many health professionals. Each will have a specific role in your rehab. While you are in rehab, make sure to stay in touch with your doctor or other health professionals who can keep track of your progress and health. You will probably keep in...

Stroke Prevention: Should I Have a Carotid Artery Procedure?
Guides through the decision to have a carotid endarterectomy or carotid artery stenting to prevent stroke if you have not already had a stroke or TIA. Lists pros and cons. Explains risks. Looks at other treatments. Has interactive tool to help you decide.

Cardiac Rehabilitation: Lifestyle Changes
A cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) program can help you make lifestyle changes. In cardiac rehabilitation (rehab), a team of health professionals provides education and support to help you make new, healthy habits. Quit smoking Quitting smoking is the best thing you can do to reduce your risk of future problems. Medicines...

Cardiac Rehabilitation: Hospital Program
Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) may start while you are in the hospital. The hospital (inpatient) program is one part, or phase, of your cardiac rehab. This phase emphasizes exercise and education. A hospital program may include: A customized exercise program, based on your medical history, clinical condition, and...

Cardiac Rehabilitation: Home Program
Your cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) might include an exercise program that you do at home. You might start this program after you go home from the hospital. The home program can be one part, or phase, of your cardiac rehab. The goals of a home program include: Making a smooth transition from hospital to home. Taking...

Cardiac Rehabilitation: Outpatient Program
Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) typically includes an outpatient program. This program is one part, or phase, of your cardiac rehab. You will likely take part in a supervised exercise program. You will receive information and tools to have a heart-healthy lifestyle, such as: Not smoking. Healthy eating. Staying at a...

Cardiac Rehabilitation: Maintenance Program
Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) includes a phase that helps you keep the healthy behaviors and habits that you learned in rehab. This phase, or program, is often referred to as the maintenance part of rehab, because it can help you maintain a heart-healthy lifestyle. Your goals may include: Lowering your risk of future...

Blood Thinners Other Than Warfarin: Taking Them Safely
Blood thinners are medicines that help prevent blood clots. Although they are called blood thinners, they don't really thin the blood. They slow down the time it takes for a blood clot to form. You have to be careful when you take blood thinner medicines. They can raise the risk of serious bleeding. But you can do some...

Nausea and Vomiting, Age 12 and Older
Briefly discusses the common causes of nausea and vomiting, including stomach illnesses, infections, health conditions, and medicines. Offers interactive tool to help decide when to seek care. Also offers home treatment tips.

Atrial Fibrillation: Should I Take an Anticoagulant to Prevent Stroke?
Guides you through the decision to take an anticoagulant to prevent stroke. Explains atrial fibrillation and risk of stroke. Lists benefits and risks of anticoagulants. Includes interactive tool to help you decide.

Stroke: Getting Dressed
A stroke often affects movement and use of one side of the body, so getting dressed is often difficult for people after a stroke. Your stroke rehab team can suggest things that can help you. But here are some tips to make getting dressed easier. Use assistive devices that may help you dress. Getting dressed may be...

Stroke: Perception Changes
When a stroke occurs on the right side of the brain, a person's ability to judge distance, size, position, rate of movement, form, and the way parts relate to the whole is affected (spatial-perceptual problems). People with these problems may have more trouble learning to care for themselves. Signs of perception...

Stroke: Changes in Emotions
After a stroke, some people feel like they have lost control of their emotions. These feelings can come from one or both of two causes. A stroke can affect parts of the brain that control how you feel. You may have emotional reactions that are different from your normal ones. For example, you may have fits of crying or...

Stroke: How to Prevent Another One
After a stroke, people feel lots of different emotions. Some people are worried that they could have another stroke. Or they may feel overwhelmed by how much there is to learn and do. Some people feel sad or depressed. No matter what emotions you are feeling, you can give yourself some control and peace of mind by...

Stroke: Common Problems
The problems you have after a stroke depend on what part of your brain was affected and how much damage the stroke caused. They may include problems with: Movement and senses. You may have trouble walking, grasping objects, or doing other tasks. Other symptoms may include joint pain or muscle stiffness or spasms. You...

Self-Care After a Stroke
After a stroke, keep in mind that you are the most important person in your own recovery. You need to have a major say in the decisions about your care. This may be hard for you, and you may sometimes feel like sitting back and letting others take charge. Make sure others understand that you want to be involved in the...

Stroke Rehabilitation
How does stroke rehabilitation (rehab) help you get better after a stroke? The best way to get better after a stroke is to start stroke rehabilitation (rehab). The goal of stroke rehab is to help you recover, prevent problems, and regain skills you may have lost or to make the most of your remaining abilities. Stroke...

After a Stroke: Helping Your Family Adjust
If you have a family member who has had a stroke, you may be concerned about how the stroke is going to affect your family's lifestyle. You may be concerned about finances and changes in family roles and responsibilities. Here are some ways to help your loved one and other family members adjust: Realize that after a...

Stroke: Speech and Language Problems
Some people have speech and language problems after a stroke. Their ability to speak, read, or write may be affected. Also, they may not be able to understand what someone else is saying. Trouble communicating can be very frustrating. When you talk to someone who's had a stroke, be understanding and supportive. You...

Atrial Fibrillation: Which Anticoagulant Should I Take to Prevent Stroke?
Guides you through the decision to take warfarin or a different anticoagulant (apixaban, dabigatran, edoxaban, or rivaroxaban) to prevent stroke. Explains atrial fibrillation and risk of stroke. Lists benefits and risks of anticoagulants.

Stroke: Your Rehabilitation Team
Your stroke rehab team will include doctors and nurses who specialize in stroke rehab, as well as other professionals. Each team member will help you in specific ways. The team may include the following professionals. Rehab doctor A rehab doctor is a specialist in charge of your rehab program. The doctor may also work...

Stroke: Problems With Ignoring the Affected Side
Some people who have had a stroke ignore or are not aware of one side of their body. This can happen when the stroke damages one side of the brain. Caregivers may notice signs that the person is ignoring, or neglecting, the affected side, such as: Mentioning or responding to stimulation only on the unaffected side of...

Stroke: Preventing Injury in Affected Limbs
After a stroke, you may not feel temperature, touch, pain, or sharpness on one side of your body. This may lead to injuries such as: Cuts and scratches. These can happen if your nails aren't kept short and smooth. For example, if you can't feel sensations in your feet, you won't know if your toenail is cutting into your...

Stroke: Memory Tips
A stroke often causes memory problems. If a person has problems with memory, you might get helpful tips from their stroke rehab team. These tips may include: Set a daily routine, if possible. Warn the person about upcoming changes in routine. Someone who has had a stroke may be very sensitive to minor changes in the...

Driving a Car After a Stroke
After a stroke, problems with your vision, speech, or ability to move can change your ability to drive safely. So you'll need your doctor's approval to drive again. This may be hard to accept. This may feel like a big loss of independence. But this approval is for the safety of yourself and others. Talk with your doctor...

Stroke: Behavior Changes
Depending on what part of the brain was affected, a person may not act the same after a stroke as they acted before the stroke. In some cases, these behavior changes may be the result of an emotional or psychological problem. But they might also be linked to: A memory problem. For example, someone may need reminders to...

Stroke: Bladder and Bowel Problems
Urinary incontinence Some people who have a stroke suffer loss of bladder control (urinary incontinence) after the stroke. But this is usually temporary. And it can have many causes, including infection, constipation, and the effects of medicines. If you have problems controlling your bladder, your doctor may: Test a...

Stroke: Dealing With Depression
It is common to feel sad about changes caused by the stroke. Sometimes the injury to the brain from the stroke can cause depression. If you think you might be depressed, tell your doctor right away. The sooner you know if you are depressed, the sooner you can get treatment. Treatment can help you feel better. Your...

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